Posts tagged The Tennessean

Living Without Air Conditioning

The Tennessean this morning profiled Karl Meyer, who lives green. I’m very impressed with his ability to live without air conditioning. We keep our thermostat around 80 and use fans. He just uses fans.

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Newspaper Circulars

I have written many times on my blog about the problem of newspaper circulars being thrown onto driveways and not picked up by the homeowners. Locally, The Tennessean puts these in plastic bags, which I usually find clogging the storm drains or left to decompose in the street. In Atlanta, the Journal-Constitution has been charged with breaking the litter law. Read this online report from cbsatlanta.com.

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Young Entrepreneur

This is a great story that was published in The Tennessean recently:

Lockeland Springs boy wonder recycles glass
Six-year-old has his own green business

By Nancy Deville • THE TENNESSEAN • December 21, 2009

Six-year-old Gunner is concerned about ‘keeping the earth healthy’ and has turned his hobby into a profitable business.

The youngster, with a little help from his stepdad, has started Gunner’s Glass Recycling.

His concept is pretty simple. When you sign up, he delivers a plastic container with his green “G” logo plastered to the side.

And for $5, he’ll pick up your recycled glass twice a month. Gunner and his stepdad then dispose of the items at the Metro East Recycling Center, just a few miles from their home.

“I just really like recycling, and it makes me happy,” the youngster said. “I don’t want to see any trash on the ground.”

Learning as he goes
Gunner has that same passion at home, where he’s known as the recycle police.

He monitors what’s thrown away and grabs cardboard, cans and bottles that were not properly disposed of and places them in the appropriate bins.

“I look for the symbols on all the bottles and put them in the right container,” he said.

His parents are just as surprised as everyone else that Gunner has such enthusiasm on saving the environment.

“He was asking about money, so I thought we could combine the two,” said Shawn Sweeney, Gunner’s stepfather. “We go and hang out for a couple of hours on Sundays, and it’s been very good for me.

“I want to teach him a few things about responsibility, all while making a little money.”

Sweeney says Gunner is already learning it’s a lot smarter to save and not spend all his money. He stashes most of his earnings in his bank account, but keeps some of the money in his piggy bank.

What Metro doesn’t do, he does
Gunner’s business is filling a void for many Lockeland Springs residents. Recycled glass is not collected curbside by Metro Public Works, but residents can utilize the drop off program and take glass, along with other recyclables, to various collection sites.

“The younger generation already understands, and recycling is an active part of their lives,” said Veronica Frazier, head of Metro Beautification. “This is a needed service because people want convenient recycling opportunities.”

So far Gunner’s up to about 38 customers, many of whom say they are recycling more because of his efforts.

“The service was very appealing to me because I could avoid going to the recycling place,” said Andrew Perlmutter. “With his dad’s help, Gunner is really getting a good look at how to run a business and take a problem and turn it into a positive solution.”

Jennifer Cook has been a customer of Gunner’s for about six months and has already referred his services to others.

“It’s such a cool thing. I just set the container on the porch and, it’s empty when I get back,” she said. “For $5 a month I get a container and help a kid, so it’s a win-win for everyone.

“It’s great to show a child you can have an idea and then put it into fruition.”

Contact Nancy DeVille at ndeville@tennessean.com or 615-259-8304.

He’s become one of the youngest recycling gurus in Lockeland Springs, and he’s giving neighbors a reason to be more environmentally friendly.

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Cigarette Litter Prevention Program

I’ve been involved in a Keep America Beautiful Cigarette Litter Prevention Program this summer. Here is a link to a story that ran in the Tennessean this morning.

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Newspaper Mush

mushypaper_1608This is what happens when the weekly shopper produced by the Tennessean is left in a driveway, then rained on and driven over a few times. No one wants these. Since it is too expensive to send in the mail (which used to happen), the newspapers are left in driveways. I pick up quite a few of them which have been abandoned each week.

Sometimes, the newspapers walk to road or storm drains. I try to recycle them before the enter the water stream.

recycling4live.com

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More Trash Being Delivered Weekly to Our Streets

newspaperwbag_1416The local newspaper, The Tennessean, once a week publishes local news for some of the communities in the Nashville area. Until a few weeks ago, this local edition was packaged with ad inserts and mailed to everyone. I gladly received it weekly in my mailbox with other mail.

I know that the United States Post Office has instituted changes for different classes of mail such as periodicals and newspapers. Recently I have noticed that this weekly edition of local news is being packaged in plastic and tossed in driveways whether you want the news or not.

Most folks do not want it and do not pick it up. I found several today double bagged and wet in the streets of my neighborhood. Unfortunately, The Tennessean is counting on folks to pick up the newspaper out of the street. It is just not going to happen.

We recycle our unwanted newspaper.

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Another Reason Not to Litter

deerThis image of a deer with a jack-o-lantern was published in the Tennessean (Nashville) this morning. Fortunately, the deer was noticed by people who reported it to the game warden. The wildlife officials were able to remove the jack-o-lantern from the young deer, who returned to the wild.

Wildlife spokesmen believed that the deer was trying to drink water from an abandoned jack-o-lantern and was trapped inside the plastic pumpkin.

During the Great American Clean Up, I have been posting images of litter that can be harmful to wildlife. Please protect the animals.

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Don’t Recycle It, When You Don’t Need It in the First Place

Last year, I was challenged by a reader of this blog, when I was bragging about the amount of stuff my husband and I took to the recycling center. I mentioned that newspapers, a daily Tennessean and a daily Wall Street Journal, were the majority of our recyclable load.

She chided me as to why I bought daily newspapers in the first place, when the content could be read on line. I admitted that I liked to sit in my easy chair each morning, drink coffee, scan the news, then do the crossword puzzle. She replied that I should buy a book of crossword puzzles.

In 2008 as one of my New Year Resolutions, I stopped the daily delivery of the newspapers to the house. At first, I could not sit at the computer, read the paper online and drink the caffeine stimulant to jumpstart the day. I preferred to sit in my easy chair with my feet propped up, drink coffee and read a book.

I would gather daily headlines off the internet later between tasks at work. Many days, I received no news, but fortunately, I realized that I really did not need to read the live newspaper each day. I bought a book of crossword puzzles to stimulate my mind.

I have saved money and saved a few trees this year.

Next I announced to the husband that we were not buying paper towels any more. These were not being recycled, but going into the landfill with our trash. I bought a package of 60 cotton household towels from my favorite megastore. We have used less than half the bag of towels for the first time, as we launder them with the bathroom towels weekly.

Now, we’ve saved money and reduced what we send to the landfill each year.

Did we stop there? No way. I announced next that we did not need paper napkins. Again, this is a paper product being used and tossed into a landfill. We have a set of polyester (linen-looking) napkins that we use for guests. And if we have not had a chance to launder our napkins, I’ve presented our guests with a clean cotton household towel to use. Since my friends know that I’ve become environmentally-crazy, these have been accepted with a chuckle.

Both my husband and I suffer from allergies. I stopped buying Kleenex tissues long ago. I have tried to carry a bandana handkerchief around with me, but it never seems to be present when I need it (just like those reusable grocery bags in the closet). Instead, I use toilet paper to clear my sinuses. Toilet paper is the one paper product I refuse to live without. Recyclable or not.

When you make your New Year’s Resolutions soon, try reducing the amount of stuff you recycle or throw into the garbage can.

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Don't Recycle It, When You Don't Need It in the First Place

Last year, I was challenged by a reader of this blog, when I was bragging about the amount of stuff my husband and I took to the recycling center. I mentioned that newspapers, a daily Tennessean and a daily Wall Street Journal, were the majority of our recyclable load.

She chided me as to why I bought daily newspapers in the first place, when the content could be read on line. I admitted that I liked to sit in my easy chair each morning, drink coffee, scan the news, then do the crossword puzzle. She replied that I should buy a book of crossword puzzles.

In 2008 as one of my New Year Resolutions, I stopped the daily delivery of the newspapers to the house. At first, I could not sit at the computer, read the paper online and drink the caffeine stimulant to jumpstart the day. I preferred to sit in my easy chair with my feet propped up, drink coffee and read a book.

I would gather daily headlines off the internet later between tasks at work. Many days, I received no news, but fortunately, I realized that I really did not need to read the live newspaper each day. I bought a book of crossword puzzles to stimulate my mind.

I have saved money and saved a few trees this year.

Next I announced to the husband that we were not buying paper towels any more. These were not being recycled, but going into the landfill with our trash. I bought a package of 60 cotton household towels from my favorite megastore. We have used less than half the bag of towels for the first time, as we launder them with the bathroom towels weekly.

Now, we’ve saved money and reduced what we send to the landfill each year.

Did we stop there? No way. I announced next that we did not need paper napkins. Again, this is a paper product being used and tossed into a landfill. We have a set of polyester (linen-looking) napkins that we use for guests. And if we have not had a chance to launder our napkins, I’ve presented our guests with a clean cotton household towel to use. Since my friends know that I’ve become environmentally-crazy, these have been accepted with a chuckle.

Both my husband and I suffer from allergies. I stopped buying Kleenex tissues long ago. I have tried to carry a bandana handkerchief around with me, but it never seems to be present when I need it (just like those reusable grocery bags in the closet). Instead, I use toilet paper to clear my sinuses. Toilet paper is the one paper product I refuse to live without. Recyclable or not.

When you make your New Year’s Resolutions soon, try reducing the amount of stuff you recycle or throw into the garbage can.

NP NowPublic

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Mother’s Little Helpers

These are the pills today that we collected at the Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day, sponsored by Metro Public Works, at the Bellevue Recycling Drop Off Center. We filled a large bucket about one-fourth full. It’s amazing! Some of my pills are in this container.

We plan to do these collections quarterly. If you can’t make it to a collection site, here is how to dispose of medications properly:

Remove the medication from its original container and place it in a sealable plastic bag and mix it with an undesirable substance such as used coffee grounds or kitty litter. I have mixed meds with used kitty litter in the past. Dispose of in your household garbage, which should be taken to an environmentally engineered and protective landfill.

NEVER flush unused medications down a toilet or sink. The drugs could make it to the water supply.

While the collection day was a huge success, there was some confusion in The Tennessean over paint collection. We turned away about 75 people who wanted to recycle paint. Paint has to be taken to the hazardous waste collection center in East Nashville. Paint is another substance that should never be dumped into the sewer system, as it will make its way to the water supply.

Lots of activity in the recycling world took place today. There were roadside clean ups in the Bellevue area, a shredding machine at the Bellevue Center Mall site, as well as other collections. It’s great to see all this activity in the community.

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