Posts tagged Stuff

Tess

I love this item about a woman named Tess, who carried her trash around with her for two weeks. Recently I removed the trash can from my office, when I realized that I rarely used it. If I have trash, I take it down the hall to a communal trash can. That also gives me a break away from my desk. Removing the trash can has made me think about how much trash I  accumulate and helps me reduce the amount. My recycling bin in the office is full, but I haven’t emptied it in a few weeks.

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Plastic Clothes

plasticjacket_0629.jpg

I bought this jacket several years ago. It was made from plastic “coke” bottles by a company called N-VIRON-mental. When I googled N-VIRON-mental, no link appeared, and I’m assuming that they are out of business. When I googled “clothes made from plastic bottles,” many options appeared. I bought the jacket because of the orange T for the University of Tennessee, my alma mater. Most sportswear for UT is orange and tacky, but this jacket was tasteful. It’s also warm and has lasted well. Since plastic takes about 450 years to break down, I should have it for a while.

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More Than 16 Tons

I received my KTnB Today newsletter in the mail. There are stats* on the front page from the Great American Cleanup campaign which was waged March 1-May 31 across the nation. In the state of Tennessee, all 95 counties participated, and over 150,000 volunteers picked up the following litter during the spring clean up:

  • 4,994,685 pounds of litter and debris were collected
  • 2,052,033 pounds of stuff that was recycled
  • 192 illegal dump sites were cleaned
  • 3271 junk cars were collected
  • 30,984 tires were rounded up

It’s been my experience that once the litter is removed, more litter replaces it. Based on these stats above, during a calendar year this much litter is probably dumped in the state of Tennessee:

  • 19,978,740 pounds of litter and debris
  • 8,208,132 pounds of stuff that could be recycled
  • 768 illegal dump sites are formed (I know of at least two)
  • 13,084 cars are junked (Again, there are two in my part of the county that I know about)
  • 123,986 tires are discarded

Based on my hypothetical numbers above, almost 10,000 tons of litter and debris are dropped on the state of Tennessee each year. Over 4000 tons of recyclable material are thrown onto the roadways. Incredible.

*Courtesy of Keep Tennessee Beautiful

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Hello, My Name is PlanetTrash and I'm an iPOD addict

ipod_0589.jpg iPOD surrounded by four gourds and three lemons

Christmas 2004, I received an iPOD, an item I thought was cool, but never realized I couldn’t live without it. At first, I put a few of my CDs on it; soon I imported almost all of my CDs on it. Later, I frequented the iTunes Store more and more until I had over 3000 songs on my iPOD. I never left home without it.

One day recently, my iPOD wouldn’t work. Pragsdale, the IT guy, couldn’t get it to work. He has performed miracles on others’ iPODs, but my hard drive was fried. “Damn, global warming!” I cried. I knew that I shouldn’t have taken it outside this summer when the heat index was 116 degrees or more.

Pragsdale said that I could replace the hard drive. I would need to order one, and he would install it. But I want my, I want my iPOD. And I want it now! I rushed out and bought a new iPOD on steroids with 160GB.

Should I throw old 20GB iPOD in the kitchen trash can in a plastic bag? Then toss the plastic bag into a garbage truck; bury it among snotty kleenexes, half eaten cantaloupes, the unidentified moldy stuff from the ‘fridge, newspapers, magazines, bits of a broken lung, plastic bottles, fake plastic trees and chewed up dog toys? And the purple organ of an animal that the cat dragged in?

No, we will buy a new hard drive and have a spare iPOD. Never to go through iPOD withdrawal again.

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Hello, My Name is PlanetTrash and I’m an iPOD addict

ipod_0589.jpg iPOD surrounded by four gourds and three lemons

Christmas 2004, I received an iPOD, an item I thought was cool, but never realized I couldn’t live without it. At first, I put a few of my CDs on it; soon I imported almost all of my CDs on it. Later, I frequented the iTunes Store more and more until I had over 3000 songs on my iPOD. I never left home without it.

One day recently, my iPOD wouldn’t work. Pragsdale, the IT guy, couldn’t get it to work. He has performed miracles on others’ iPODs, but my hard drive was fried. “Damn, global warming!” I cried. I knew that I shouldn’t have taken it outside this summer when the heat index was 116 degrees or more.

Pragsdale said that I could replace the hard drive. I would need to order one, and he would install it. But I want my, I want my iPOD. And I want it now! I rushed out and bought a new iPOD on steroids with 160GB.

Should I throw old 20GB iPOD in the kitchen trash can in a plastic bag? Then toss the plastic bag into a garbage truck; bury it among snotty kleenexes, half eaten cantaloupes, the unidentified moldy stuff from the ‘fridge, newspapers, magazines, bits of a broken lung, plastic bottles, fake plastic trees and chewed up dog toys? And the purple organ of an animal that the cat dragged in?

No, we will buy a new hard drive and have a spare iPOD. Never to go through iPOD withdrawal again.

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The TV Dilemma

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From left to right: Magnavox 27″ circa 1990; JVC 27″ circa 1991; Sharp 20″ circa 1986

What are we going to do with all these analog TV sets? We’ve checked on the web and haven’t been able to locate a site locally to recycle the three that we have. We’re still using the old sets and haven’t moved to HDTV yet, but the itch is there to move up to home theatre. One of the old sets was inherited when my mother died years ago. Crutchfield Electronics offered these suggestions for TV disposal a while back. We will just replace the three oldies with one HDTV. With the internet, we don’t need more than one set.

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Visit My Blog, Please

I need one more hit to hit 1000.

Last night, I discovered that my bus ticket is made of plastic. I should have known since it contained information about the number of rides I had remaining.

Also, Ken Burns’ The War discussed recycling, called salvaging then, on Tuesday night’s episode. This documentary played a movie which illustrated how to remove both ends of a can, put them inside the empty can, then flatten the can with a foot. The cans were then stacked in a box and taken to the salvage man, along with household grease as bacon drippings, which was used in ammunition. All types of metal objects were saved and taken to the salvage man.

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